Wednesday, May 02, 2007

Belief - O - Matic

Beliefnet.com has a quiz called the Belief-O-Matic. You are asked a series of questions. You provide the answer as close to your personally held beliefs and to rank how important that belief is. Based on your answers, it compares your beliefs (as you have presented them) with their database of religious beliefs. This goes beyond the scope of just what flavor of Christian you are. This compares your answers among all world religions.

Here are my results.
1. Orthodox Quaker (100%)
2. Mainline to Liberal Christian Protestants (93%)
3. Eastern Orthodox (92%)
4. Roman Catholic (92%)
5. Seventh Day Adventist (91%)
6. Mainline to Conservative Christian/Protestant (89%)
7. Hinduism (69%)
8. Liberal Quakers (69%)
9. Bahá'í Faith (65%)
10. Orthodox Judaism (65%)
11. Sikhism (65%)
12. Islam (57%)
13. Unitarian Universalism (56%)
14. Reform Judaism (54%)
15. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormons) (49%)
16. Jehovah's Witness (44%)
17. Jainism (42%)
18. Mahayana Buddhism (36%)
19. Neo-Pagan (36%)
20. Theravada Buddhism (35%)
21. Christian Science (Church of Christ, Scientist) (31%)
22. New Age (29%)
23. Secular Humanism (28%)
24. Scientology (26%)
25. Taoism (20%)
26. New Thought (20%)
27. Nontheist (16%)

Now before any of you start doubting my Christian faith, let me say that across the global stage of religions, there are similarities that will harmonize. In fact the top 4 that I relate closest to are very strong Christian traditions.

But why on earth would my beliefs come back as Orthodox Quaker, you may wonder? Remember that I said that your beliefs are only part of the equation. It is also important to take into account how strong that belief is within your personal system. Two of my answers would push me into the Quaker camp.

First, I believe strongly in the social responsibility of Christians. I believe that we are called to respond to the needs of our neighbors, our community, and our world. We are to step up to fill in the gaps were society abandons and casts people off. The Quakers are very strong in social responsibility.

Second, I have a slight belief that we are not supposed to be active in violence. This is something I struggle with, though. I do not condone violence as the best means to a solution. I do not want to perpetrate violence against another living being, personally. Taking another person's life is a horrible action. Yet at the same time, there are moments when I can see that violence is justifiable. I don't like it, but it is the internal dilemma that I face.

Based on these two responses, I believe that is why Orthodox Quaker got pushed up into the number one spot.

What do you believe? Try it out at Belief-O-Matic